Monthly Archives: November 2017

Vatican Astronomer Giving Free Faith and Science Talk — Tuesday 11/28/17

Most religions, and pastors shy away from addressing the dynamics of faith and science. In fact, research studies indicate this failure by the church and their members to discuss faith and science, is a prime reason millennials have lost interest in religion.

It is indeed refreshing to discover that APU’s Regina Boisclair, Ph.D, Professor of Religious Studies and Cardinal Newman Chair, is bringing Br. Guy Consolmagno, S.J., Ph.D. to Alaska to make several presentations on “God’s Mechanics, The Spiritual Life of Techies”.

A free local lecture, Tuesday, November 28 at St. Patrick’s Church, 2111 Muldoon Road, 7:00-8:30 p.m., will allow the public to hear Br. Guy Consolmagno, director of the Vatican Observatory in Rome and Tucson.

For a brief, 5 minute, video introduction to this notable astronomer, click here: A lengthier TedX talk is available to watch by clicking here:

He believes in the need for science and religion to work alongside one another rather than as competing ideologies. In 2006, he said, “Religion needs science to keep it away from superstition and keep it close to reality, to protect it from creationism, which at the end of the day is a kind of paganism – it’s turning God into a nature god.”

On July 2, 2014, he was awarded the Carl Sagan Medal for outstanding communication by an active planetary scientist to the general public by the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society.  Known as “The Pope’s Astronomer,” he was named by Pope Francis to be the Director of the Vatican Observatory in September 2015.

Come early to claim your seat and have your thinking challenged.

Chris Thompson

Thanksgiving Interfaith Service – Great Idea!

Thanksgiving, historically, was not a religious celebration. Rather, it was a harvest meal in the early days of the Plymouth Colony recognizing a bountiful harvest that would stave off a repeat of the famine that originally decimated the colony.  Thanksgiving has grown into a secular holiday in our country as seen by recognizing our bounty with huge feasts, football, shopping, and gatherings of family and friends.  There is much to be thankful for in our country, but it is also appropriate to recognize Thanksgiving in a joint faith community manner.

In what has become an annual tradition in Anchorage, the Interfaith Council of Anchorage, in conjunction with First Christian Church, will hold a Thanksgiving Eve service. Local faith communities will gather to give thanks and provide the music and messages in a spiritually uplifting venue. The program will begin with a drum circle, and there will be drums available for those who want to participate. Featuring short readings, brief messages, reflections, and music from an interfaith choir, the program will focus on celebrating joy, thanksgiving, and our strength as a community, with all of our shared traditions as well as our wonderful differences.

This year the service will be held at First Christian Church, 3031 LaTouche St., Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 7 p.m.

At the conclusion of the service, a reception will be held with savory and sweet finger food being served.

Thank you Interfaith Council of Anchorage for keeping this tradition alive. At a time when few local churches recognize the strengths and joy of true Thanksgiving, it great to know the interfaith community is making a difference.

Chris Thompson

Evensong Blessing on the Feast of All Saints

Gavin Duncan, All Saints Episcopal Church’s organist, was playing Bach’s Fantasia in G Major as I entered their beautiful sanctuary on November 1. The church was respectfully quiet with a sparse collection of worshipers present who were awaiting the service. The purpose of my visit was to attend their Evensong service for the Feast of All Saints. As I entered, a greeter handed me a beautifully printed, colored, special 10-page order of service for the evening, which included all of the readings and music used in the service. (see attached pdf)

If you are unfamiliar with Evensong services the Episcopal Church describes them in this way. “Since the late middle ages “evensong” has been the popular name for vespers (from the Latin vesperis, “evening”), the Evening Office of the western church. Cranmer used it in the 1549 BCP. Although in 1552 he replaced it with “Evening Prayer,” the common name remains “evensong.” In many Anglican cathedrals and other large churches, especially in England, evensong is sung by clergy and choir as a choral liturgy.” (see

The order of service noted “the Feast of All Saints or the Solemnity of All Saints, is an ancient Christian festival celebrated in honor of all the saints, known and unknown. This day is celebrated with the firm belief that there is a powerful spiritual bond between those in heaven — the Church triumphant — and the living — the Church militant.”

This was a strongly participative service with choral, spoken word, congregational singing, and prayer. Mr. Duncan directed the choir from the organ, as he played, no small feat. Greg MacDonald, worship leader, led the congregation in singing and responsive readings. Rector David Terwilliger delivered a brief homily.

I don’t know how you do church, but found this evening to be a blessing, filled with thoughts of friends here, and those departed.  Having recently experienced the loss of a loved one, I was deeply moved by this entire service.  I encourage this fine congregation to continue this wonderful tradition. I’ll be most happy to spread the word in advance. Thank you All Saints people!

All Saints Evensong program

Chris Thompson